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US ERE HIGHLIGHTS THIS MONTH

TITLE
INVENTIONS
Everyday life and the working world of all of us will change a lot in the next few years. This is ensured by Artificial Intelligence and the Internet of Things, in which billions of machines are networked worldwide. The development not only drives researchers at universities, public institutes and global corporations, but also hobby inventors and engineers in small companies.

MUSEUM WITH DEEPER
To protect shipwrecks on the seabed from looters, archeologists are making the sunken ships and their precious cargo available to tourists in underwater museums. display

ICE VOLCANAS IN THE SUN SYSTEM
On the dwarf planet Charon and on some moons researchers have tracked down ice volcanoes. Their lava comes from saltwater oceans deep below the surface.

THE BRAIN MAKER LEARNS TO THIS
Physicians routinely use the deep brain stimulation method to relieve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. New devices now promise individual treatment.

IN THE TERM OF THE GEYSER
A volcanologist has looked Icelandic hot water spitters with cameras deep in the throat. His findings also help to better understand volcanic eruptions.

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Editorial

Dear Readers,

Nobody is creative at the push of a button - but high expectations inspire. Even a nagging problem and the well-founded expectation to be the first to solve it inspire thinking. This balance between incentive and freedom is as helpful for students as it is for seasoned scientists.

Transparency, comparability and competition are a tried and tested method against routine and frugality in science. This was demonstrated not least by the nationwide funding program of the Excellence Initiative, which has led many universities to reflect on their strengths and sharpen their profile. Universities can submit their applications for a new round by the beginning of April.

Unfortunately, the other side of the competition is just as visible: Researchers have to submit more and more applications and examine their peers. When spectacular results fail, the situation is sometimes not analyzed to learn from it, but nicely spoken, because the system does not forgive mistakes and detours.

The balance between incentive and freedom is based on a humanistic image of man: people are by nature ambitious and inventive, need only occasionally a little nudge. The motto could be: control is good, but trust is better. Unfortunately, this is often done differently in our society.

We in the bdw-editors are against it and invite you to a competition! In keeping with our cover story "Inventions that change your life", we ask you for impetus: Which invention would significantly improve your life? ("Your opinion is needed", page 28). The best ideas are presented in our June issue - each commented by a specialist. In addition, you have all the freedoms of the world. We look forward to your mail! All information can be found from page 84.

PS: In this issue, we invite you to exciting events again: A study tour leads you into the electricity production of tomorrow (pages 6 and 7), and on a research day you will get to know the new techniques of visualization (page 102).

Your Alexander Mäder

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