In contrast to well-stocked steak, bloody beef contains fewer heterocyclic aromatic amines. These increase the risk of developing bladder cancer. In contrast to well-stocked steak, bloody beef contains fewer heterocyclic aromatic amines. These increase the risk of developing bladder cancer. Picture:
Reading aloud Anyone who consumes large quantities of long, seared meat risks a bladder tumor. This relationship has been identified by US scientists who evaluated data from more than 1700 patients over 12 years. In the study group with the highest consumption of red meats, the risk of bladder cancer was half that of the group that consumed less red meat. The triggers are the so-called heterocyclic aromatic amines, which form increasingly at a temperature of 220 degrees in the preparation of muscle meat. When cooking and steaming or cooking in the microwave, the unwanted substance does not arise. Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are produced when beef, pork, poultry and fish muscle meat are cooked at very high temperatures. In doing so, amino acids react with creatine, an organic acid that helps to supply the muscles with energy. "It is known that HAAs cause cancer, " reports Jie Lin of the University of Texas. Previous studies have identified 17 HAAs associated with uncontrolled cell growth. So far, especially had been warned against colon cancer.

The study involved 884 patients from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center with bladder tumors and 878 people without disease. The compilation took into account age, gender and ethnicity. To collect data, the scientists used the standard international questionnaire, which determines eating habits. The study participants were then divided into four groups depending on the amount of their meat consumption. Over the course of three years, methods of meat preparation and the emergence of the three most frequently detected HAAs were also examined.

In the group with the highest consumption of red meat, the risk of bladder cancer was 50 percent higher than that of the weak meat eater. Especially the diet with steaks, chops and fried bacon proved to be critical, but also sharply heated white meat of chicken and fish increased the number of tumor patients. In addition, the degree of Durchbratens proved to be a criterion: The study participants who preferred half-meat meat, reduced the likelihood of illness by half? a "medium" prepared steak is therefore preferable to the "well-done". The scientists were able to prove that the disease also broke out more often in certain genetically determined metabolic forms.

"Our research confirms the relationship between diet and cancer, " explains study author Xifeng Wu. "The findings confirm our suspicion that people who eat spicy, fried or grilled red meat are more likely to develop bladder cancer." Scientists now want to develop a predictive model for an individual cancer risk that includes factors such as the environment, diet and genetic makeup. display

Jie Lin (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston) et al .: Lecture 101st Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research ddp / science.de? Rochus Rademacher

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