Rugby game. Image: da.wikipedia.org
Reading The secret of the targeted rugby offense is in the arms: If the player swings an arm in front of his chest in a characteristic way, the shot gets particularly far or accurately into the opponent's goal. This was discovered by British researchers around Neil Bezodis from the University of Bath in motion studies with rugby players. With the arm movement, players can better distribute the rotational forces that act on the body during kick-off and ball contact. Thus, the kick succeeds with the egg-shaped ball very precisely. The researchers analyzed the movement of five rugby players at the kick. For this they attached 39 reflective markings to the subjects. The ball also received a mark. Using a high-speed camera, the researchers tracked the markings and reconstructed the sequence of movements in the computer model. The result: the kick with the ball? about with the right foot? is more precise when the player swings synchronously with the opposite, left arm forward and in front of the chest.

With this coordinated body movement, players minimize possible deviations from the ideal line of the shot. In addition, they can continue shooting. The aim of the rugby game is to use fair physical effort to bring the ball over the opponent's baseline or to shoot it through with a kick between two crossbars, the goal. With a penalty, which is awarded after a foul or offside, a player can achieve a space gain by shooting far into the opponent's side, said the coach of the German Rugby Association in Hannover, Peter Ianusevici. The player can also score with a precise shot into the opponent's goal.

As noted by the British researchers, many outstanding professional players are already taking note of the ideally coordinated leg-arm movement while kicking. However, this is more the result of prolonged practice, explain the researchers. With their results, they want to give the players a training guide for the right shoot while kicking.

Communication from the University of Bath (UK) ddp / science.de? Martin Schäfer advertisement

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